Event Title

Intervention model preferences of people who clutter

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Publication Date

27-4-2022

Degree Name

Speech-Language Pathology, M.S.Ed.

Department

Speech-Language Pathology

School

School of Professions

Description

Intervention model preferences of people who clutter

Cluttering is a complex disorder of speech characterized by a rapid and irregular speaking rate, excessive disfluencies, abnormal pauses, and poor language organization. In the present study, five adult men diagnosed with cluttering were interviewed to obtain their perspectives on three alternative models for treating cluttering: 1) a traditional (“medical”) model; 2) a social model, derived from the disability rights literature; and 3) an individual differences model, derived from the psychology of individual differences literature. Perceived strengths and limitations were obtained for each model and emergent themes were captured using qualitative analysis procedures. Results suggested that both the traditional model and the individual differences model were judged favorably by all participants. The social model was received less favorably. The results of this study offer a unique perspective from the individual who clutters that can inform therapy practices to better reflect client values.

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Apr 27th, 12:00 AM

Intervention model preferences of people who clutter

Intervention model preferences of people who clutter

Cluttering is a complex disorder of speech characterized by a rapid and irregular speaking rate, excessive disfluencies, abnormal pauses, and poor language organization. In the present study, five adult men diagnosed with cluttering were interviewed to obtain their perspectives on three alternative models for treating cluttering: 1) a traditional (“medical”) model; 2) a social model, derived from the disability rights literature; and 3) an individual differences model, derived from the psychology of individual differences literature. Perceived strengths and limitations were obtained for each model and emergent themes were captured using qualitative analysis procedures. Results suggested that both the traditional model and the individual differences model were judged favorably by all participants. The social model was received less favorably. The results of this study offer a unique perspective from the individual who clutters that can inform therapy practices to better reflect client values.