Event Title

Trophic Effects of a Non-native Benthic Fish Potentially Extend Beyond the Stream Shore

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Publication Date

4-4-2022

Degree Name

Biology, M.A.

Department

Biology Department

School

School of Arts and Sciences

Description

Fish impart a range of direct and indirect effects within stream communities. Whether these effects extend beyond the shoreline, or whether non-native benthic fishes diminish or enhance those effects remains untested. Previous studies on non-native fish effects in streams have focused on the role of drift-feeding fishes, with few investigations into how non-native, benthic-feeding fishes might influence stream communities. We have initiated a study to assess the relationship between invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), and stream drift, which then may extend beyond the shoreline to affect long-jawed spiders (Tetragnathidae) in the riparian zone. Preliminary data showed sites with Round Goby present had more chironomids in the drift, compared to locations without gobies. Further, long-jawed spiders were less abundant in the riparian zones of sites with Round Gobies present relative to locations with no gobies. Thus, the impacts of an invasive benthic fish may have both direct effects on benthic abundances and drift densities of key taxa, and indirect effects on riparian spiders thru their shared prey.

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Apr 4th, 12:00 AM

Trophic Effects of a Non-native Benthic Fish Potentially Extend Beyond the Stream Shore

Fish impart a range of direct and indirect effects within stream communities. Whether these effects extend beyond the shoreline, or whether non-native benthic fishes diminish or enhance those effects remains untested. Previous studies on non-native fish effects in streams have focused on the role of drift-feeding fishes, with few investigations into how non-native, benthic-feeding fishes might influence stream communities. We have initiated a study to assess the relationship between invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), and stream drift, which then may extend beyond the shoreline to affect long-jawed spiders (Tetragnathidae) in the riparian zone. Preliminary data showed sites with Round Goby present had more chironomids in the drift, compared to locations without gobies. Further, long-jawed spiders were less abundant in the riparian zones of sites with Round Gobies present relative to locations with no gobies. Thus, the impacts of an invasive benthic fish may have both direct effects on benthic abundances and drift densities of key taxa, and indirect effects on riparian spiders thru their shared prey.